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Providers Optimistic About LTC Commission Work  
Providers Optimistic About LTC Commission Work
Association identifies reform principles to guide discussion
Contact: AHCAPressOffice@ahca.org
(202) 898-3165
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

6/27/2013
Washington, DC – The long term and post-acute care profession today applauded the initial work of the Commission on Long Term Care. 
 
“We are excited to see this Commission coming together to address the important issues around providing access to quality long term care for millions of Americans,” said Mark Parkinson, President and CEO of AHCA/NCAL.
 
“The number of people who will need skilled nursing care, or other types of long term and post-acute care, is expected to rise sharply in the coming years.  This Commission faces the challenging task of meeting that demand with quality long term care options while also addressing important financing questions.”
 
The 15-member Commission on Long Term Care, which was created by the American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012, held its first meeting today. The Commission has six months to make recommendations for establishing and implementing a system that ensures the availability of long term care services for individuals that need care.
 
In advance of today’s meeting, AHCA/NCAL identified five principles that should guide the discussion regarding long term and post-acute care reform. Any recommendations for reform should:
 
1. Promote availability of viable private long-term care financing options.
 
2. Meet consumer long term care needs and preferences.
 
3. Maximize value and cost-effectiveness.
 
4. Preserve and improve the public long-term care benefit for low-income individuals.
 
5. Better coordinate acute care and long term care.
 
“AHCA/NCAL members are solutions-driven. We hope the Commission will explore reforms that are based more on the quality of care and providing access to services in the setting needed,” said Parkinson.
 
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The American Health Care Association and National Center for Assisted Living (AHCA/NCAL) represent more than 12,000 non-profit and proprietary skilled nursing centers, assisted living communities, sub-acute centers and homes for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities. By delivering solutions for quality care, AHCA/NCAL aims to improve the lives of the millions of frail, elderly and individuals with disabilities who receive long term or post-acute care in our member facilities each day. For more information, please visit www.ahca.org or www.ncal.org.


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